PROCESSES

    TEN MISTAKES TO AVOID WHEN DEFINING A PROCESS

    Don’t:

    1. assume that a good process description on its own will make the process work – you still need to manage people.
    2. go into more detail than is needed – know your audience.
    3. repeat yourself – or say the same thing twice…
    4. use passive tense for tasks – all tasks are actions, so “verb-noun” works best.
    5. consider the “what ifs” and exceptional conditions at the outset - concentrate on the normal flow.
    6. use different terms for the same role, or document – you may need to rationalise your job titles and tidy up your document register.
    7. make a process description too long - refer to supporting documents or to a sub-process if more detail is required.
    8. be inconsistent - apply a few basic standards and simple conventions, and stick to them.
    9. use technical language or jargon – refer to a glossary if necessary.
    10. assume that everyone knows the (business) objectives which the process should satisfy – they may not even appreciate why they do what they do within the process.

    TEN COMMON MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT BUSINESS PROCESSES

    ANOTHER TEN MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT BUSINESS PROCESSES

    TEN REASONS WHY PROCESS MAPPING / MANAGEMENT IS OF VALUE

    TEN POINTS TO REMEMBER WHEN DEFINING A PROCESS

    TEN MISTAKES TO AVOID WHEN DEFINING A PROCESS

    TEN OBJECTIVES WHEN CREATING A PROCESS DESCRIPTION

    Ian Leaver of independent analyst Forward Look explains "user-centric process management"software.

    TEN FEATURES TO CONSIDER FOR PROCESS MAPPING / MANAGEMENT SYSTEM SOFTWARE

    PROCESS MANAGEMENT GLOSSARY